TCL Roku TV Review

Review: TCL 4K HDR Roku TV New 2017 P-Series


This week I have been testing two TCL Roku 2017 TVs—both the 55″ 4K HDRRoku TV and the 43″ 4K HDR Roku TV. (Disclaimer: TCL sent us a review unit of the 55″ 4K HDR Roku TV and I liked it so much I went out and purchased the 43″ 4K HDR Roku TV for our bedroom.)

So let’s take a look at what I found out.

What Is New

If you have a 2016 TCL Roku TV P-Series, you will find the 2017 version is a totally different TV from the ground up. The connectors are on the other side; the stands are taller, and the overall layout of the TV is new. TCL seems to have started from scratch with this new line of Roku TVs for 2017.

The other big improvement is the addition of 4K HDR to the TCL P-Series TVs. 4K HDR is the newest 4K standard that puts more colors on the screen and deeper blacks that give a noticeably better image.

First Impressions

The 2017 P-Series Roku TVs are fast and will give you a smooth streaming experience. When using an antenna the More Ways to Watch feature for Roku TVs was a great addition. This feature is an opt-in system that will let cord cutters watching TV with their antenna find new ways to watch a show. Now Roku will automatically search over 300 Roku channels to see if that movie or TV show is available, which will allow you to restart the movie or even find the next episode of a show you are watching.

We plugged in a USB thumb stick to test out the 90 minutes of pause, rewind, and fast-forward of live TV and found it to work smoothly with the 2017 P-Series. The ability to get an instant replay as you watch live sports is a great feature.

I did find that the 43″ TCL Roku TV was perfect as an all in one TV. The only cable you have is a power cord making it easy to hide the mess of having streaming players plugged into a TV. I also found it makes a great bedroom TV for one reason the sleep timer. Roku TVs come with a sleep timer that stops the stream of anything you are watching when it turns off the TV. That means users with a data cap will be able to save GB of data every night they would have used up as they slept.

One Thing To Be Aware Of

The thing to be aware of is not a downside as long as you are aware of it. The 2017 P-Series offers both a line of sight remote, similar to what you find with the Roku Premiere and a point anywhere remote, similar to what you would get with a Roku Ultra. You just need to make sure you look at the box or online listing to know what remote you will get.

I know some of our readers really love the point anywhere remote and for others, it does not matter.

The Bottom Line

TCL once again has built a solid TV at a great price with features other TVs charge a lot more for. Rather you want a TV for your bedroom or for your living room you will find that the 2017 TCL Roku TV line is perfect for your needs.

What if You Want Something More?

If you want a Roku TV but want something a little more beautiful or with a better image check out TCL’s new C-Series Roku TVs. They feature a super thin TV with a metallic trim that gives the TCL a high end modern look. You will also find that the C-Series has a front facing sound bar for great sound coming from the TV. With the C-Series you will get Pairs 4K Ultra HD picture clarity with the contrast, color, and detail of Dolby Vision HDR (High Dynamic Range) for the most amazing picture quality. 

The TCL 2017 P-Series TVs are TVs everyone should consider, especially if you are looking for a TV that won’t break the bank.

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  • HiroRoshi

    How is TCL with Roku updates? I helped a relative setup a TCL Roku TV he bought and it didn’t have latest version of Roku after checking for updates, maybe it eventually got it. The USB stick Live pause is cool though.

    One problem with SmartTVs in general is that they may not get updated as often as dedicated devices and worse is after a couple years they may not get anymore updates at all. That’s not just a functional issue but more importantly a security issue. IoT devices in general will become a problem if they don’t get regular security patches.

    • Peter Martin

      I bought a TCL Roku last year and it’s good about Roku updates. You can also check for updates manually. Where it’s not so good is that not every app will get updates; for instance, I’m still waiting on DirecTVNow to be available on my TCL Roku, which is quite frustrating.

      • HiroRoshi

        Will be interesting to see how long they support updates on Roku TV vs Roku devices. Seems like some pretty old Roku devices still get updates.

        • Peter Martin

          Good point. I have a Roku device from a few years ago hooked up to my small TV and THAT one got the DirecTVNow app, which, again, is kinda frustrating and defeats the “advantage” of getting a TV with Roku built-in.

          • HiroRoshi

            Do TCL Roku TVs now support removing tuner channels you don’t want? He wanted to get rid of shopping/religious channels and I couldn’t find where to block.

          • Peter Martin

            On mine, from the home/menu page, I go to Settings -> TV Inputs -> Antenna TV -> Edit channel lineup. Then you can click a box next to each channel to hide.

            It’s not intuitive, but it works!

  • Justin Harvey

    i really hope i win the giveaway i wood love this tv

  • REP

    Waiting for the 65′

  • redassedape

    Are you reviewing the S-series or the P-series? Everything you’ve written in this article seems to actually be about the S-series and not the P-series:

    – All of your Amazon links are to the S-series
    – You state that you bought a 43-inch version. There is no 43-inch version of the P-series only the S-series comes in that size.
    – You state that the C-Series has better picture quality than the P-series. That is not accurate.
    – Both the C and P series support Dolby Vision. If the set you reviewed only supports HDR10 it wasn’t the P series.

    The only thing accurate in this article seems to be about the remote :